Archive for the ‘Alerts’ Category

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Executive Orders

In Alerts on March 31, 2017 by Randolph Hollingsworth Tagged:

Given the topics and presentations at our last KATH Annual Meeting, I thought this notice might be of interest to you. On Friday, February 17th, a group of scholars led a Congressional Briefing on the history of presidential executive orders. Sponsored by the National History Center of the American Historical Association, the group included Julia Azari (Political Science, Marquette U), Matt Dallek (History, George Washington U), and Andrew Rudalevige (Political Science, Bowdoin).

– A video recording of the event can be found here on C-SPAN.org.

– You can read Dane Kennedy’s recap of the event “The Paradoxes of Presidential Power: A Brief History of Executive Orders,” on the AHA Today blog.

– The briefing summary (one page handout) can be found here.

Articles

Caroline Light

In Alerts on March 27, 2017 by Randolph Hollingsworth

Caroline Light

Dr. Caroline Light, director of undergraduate studies in the Program in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Harvard University

Caroline Light will discuss her new book, Stand Your Ground: A History of America’s Love Affair with Lethal Self-Defense (Beacon Press) on Thursday, March 30 at 3:30 p.m. in room 204 of UK’s Whitehall Classroom Building. There will be copies of the book available at the event.

KATH members should find her talk interesting and very timely. All are invited. Please download and share the flyer (.pdf file).

Thanks,
Melanie


Melanie Beals Goan
Assistant Professor, History Department
1741 Patterson Office Tower
University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY 40506-0027

Articles

Global/Local Food

In Alerts on February 19, 2017 by Randolph Hollingsworth Tagged: , , ,

This just in from University Press of Kentucky –

Flavors from Home: Refugees in Kentucky Share Their Stories and Comfort Foods, revised edition
by Aimee Zaring

Publication Date: February 24, 2017      $19.95 paper, ISBN: 978-0-8131-6959-0      ebooks available

Stories over shared food is a great way for teachers to embrace inclusion in their curriculum.


Lexington, KY—From Hungary and Iran, Cuba and Pakistan, Burma and Vietnam, refugees from all around the world now reside in Kentucky. The 15.4 million refugees currently living in the United States have, at one point in their lives, faced war, poverty, or hunger. They have feared for their lives in their own country, and they have borne witness to unspeakable events—slaughter, imprisonment, and torture. Unlike immigrants seeking economic opportunity, refugees have come to America to escape persecution. For those who ended up in the Commonwealth, Kentucky provides them with the peace and security that they need, but it is not home. Home is no longer a viable option for them.

For refugees isolated from their homeland, cooking and eating their native dishes are among the most concrete ways they can maintain their identity. In Flavors from Home: Refugees in Kentucky Share Their Stories and Comfort Foods, now available in paperback, author Aimee Zaring uses her many years of expertise working with refugees to explore their everyday life, the situations that brought them here, and the food that connects them to home. Zaring shares their personal and dramatic accounts of their survival, as well as heartwarming and fascinating stories of their transition to living in America. Zaring also illustrates the importance of understanding the persecution and struggle that these refugees have gone through and the ability of food to provide a sense of familiarity for them when home is lost.

After more than two years of traveling the Commonwealth collecting recipes, uncovering stories, and cooking a diverse mix of cuisines from throughout the world, Zaring has crafted a book that highlights the lives that the resettled refugees have been able to create for themselves in Kentucky. Just as the refugees have brought the food and culture of their home countries to Kentucky’s doorstep, Flavors from Home allows readers to experience a taste of someone else’s home without having to travel to do so. It brings together the dishes of the refugees and the hospitality of their kitchens in a way that makes the unfamiliar feel comfortable. This book speaks a language that all who read it will understand and appreciate: the universal language of food.

Aimee Zaring lives in Louisville, Kentucky where, for more than five years, she has taught ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) at Catholic Charities, Kentucky Refugee Ministries, Global LT, and Jefferson County Public Schools.

For more information, contact: Mack McCormick, Publicity Manager, 859/257-5200, permissions@uky.edu

 

Articles

KHS job opening

In Alerts on February 1, 2017 by Randolph Hollingsworth Tagged: ,

This news just in from Mandy Higgins on Twitter: “The is hiring an Oral History Administrator.”

Here’s more from the KHS website:

“The Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) seeks an oral history administrator. The oral history administrator implements the strategic direction of the Kentucky Oral History Commission (KOHC), the only commission of its kind in the United States dedicated to providing financial and technical assistance to oral history repositories, oral historians and community scholars. Since 1976, KOHC has awarded more than $1 million to more than 600 grantees throughout the Commonwealth…. The administrator will oversee the KOHC grant program and serve as a technical resource for individuals and organizations across the state. The position will provide technical advice and training on developing an oral history project, conducting oral history interviews, using digital recording equipment, digitizing oral history collections, oral history collections assessment and digital preservation of oral history collections. … Application deadline is Feb. 28, 2017.”

See more details about this job opportunity at KHS here.

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