Posts Tagged ‘social studies’

Articles

Item Review

In Alerts on July 16, 2019 by Randolph Hollingsworth Tagged: ,

The Kentucky Department of Education (KDE), Office of Standards, Assessment and Accountability (OSAA), is seeking classroom teachers (grades 3-12) and content specialists working in support of teachers to review items for future Kentucky assessments in Reading and Writing, Mathematics and Social Studies. Senate Bill 1 (2017) requires that the department implement a process to review Kentucky’s Academic Standards (KAS) and the alignment of corresponding assessments for possible revision or replacement.

Current classroom teachers (grades 3-12) or content specialists working in support of teachers interested in the review of assessment items are needed. A pool of candidates is being gathered for this critical work and participants will be notified if accepted. Currently, applications are being accepted through August 15th, 2019.

Applicants who are selected will be required to meet in Frankfort or Lexington for multiple days. Substitute teacher expense along with travel will be reimbursed. Timeline of activities will be communicated to individuals once they are determined, with work taking place in early fall.

If you have any questions, please e-mail them to dacinfo@education.ky.gov.

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Articles

Standards

In Alerts,Spotlight on July 9, 2019 by Randolph Hollingsworth Tagged: ,

Revised Kentucky Academic Standards for Social Studies adopted for 2019-20 school year

Kentucky Department of Education News Release, July 9, 2019

After undergoing a rigorous revision process that began in January 2018, revised standards for social studies became law on July 5.

The newly adopted standards will be implemented in Kentucky classrooms beginning in the 2019-2020 school year and may be accessed at kystandards.org. A “Getting to Know Your KAS for Social Studies” module also is available to support educators in the implementation of the new social studies standards.

The Kentucky Board of Education (KBE) adopted the revised social studies standards in February, and they received legislative review in May.

The process of revising the standards, last adopted in 2006, was part of the ongoing review of content area standards and aligned assessments mandated by the Kentucky General Assembly in Senate Bill 1 (2017).

Kentucky educators were involved in every step of the development of the standards. Educators, along with business and industry professionals, comprised advisory panels and a review and development committee. There were revisions by educators and community members informed by public feedback, along with review by the KBE, before the standards underwent final legislative review and became law.

The standards written by teams of Kentucky teachers outline the minimum knowledge and skills Kentucky students should learn at each grade level.

For more information on the standards revision process, visit the Kentucky Academic Standards Revision Process webpage. Contact the standards team at standards@education.ky.gov with any questions regarding the newly adopted standards or the standards revision process.

Kentucky Department of Education

Media Contact: Jessica Fletcher

Chief Communications Officer

Office: (502) 564-2000, ext. 4611

Cell: (502) 229-1915

Jessica.Fletcher@education.ky.gov

Articles

KCSS statement

In Alerts,Spotlight on April 20, 2018 by Randolph Hollingsworth Tagged: , , , , ,

The Kentucky Council for the Social Studies (KCSS) has issued a statement advocating the inclusion of more Social Studies as a graduation requirement for Kentucky high school students. See the Kentucky Department of Education’s website on minimum requirements here: https://education.ky.gov/curriculum/hsgradreq/Pages/default.aspx

KCSS seeks to have more attention paid to civic health – and readiness for civic engagement as an adult. Read the KCSS statement on their website here:

http://www.kysscouncil.org/kcss-position-statements/graduate-requirements

Articles

U.S. slavery

In Spotlight on February 21, 2018 by Randolph Hollingsworth Tagged:

The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) has released a powerful research report on the teaching of history of American slavery. Entitled “Teaching Hard History” the report concludes that we, collectively, are not adequately teaching this important part of U.S. history in high school. Indeed, since slavery was at the core of our beginnings and formation as a nation-state, we must face squarely this history’s part in the persistent disparities African Americans face today.

The report details the SPLC findings:

  • High school seniors struggle on even the most basic questions about American enslavement of Africans.
  • Teachers who are serious about teaching slavery struggle to provide deep coverage of the subject in the classroom.
  • Popular textbooks fail to comprehensively cover slavery and enslaved peoples.
  • State content standards are timid and fail to set appropriately high expectations. 

“We can and must do better. Read the report. Take the quiz. Engage with hard history.”

Articles

Women

In Spotlight on January 23, 2018 by Randolph Hollingsworth Tagged: , , , ,

An announcement from Liz Maurer at the National Women’s History Museum about their new report from an analysis of K-12 curriculum standards for each state in the U.S. We might not be surprised by the overall finding that women are most often portrayed in the curriculum standards in a domestic role.

Pie Chart on topics discussing women

Analysis from the National Women’s History Museum’s survey of K-12 social studies curriculum standards across the U.S.


I am pleased to announce that National Women’s History Museum’s recently released its new report, Where are the Women? A Report on the Status of Women in the United States Social Studies CurriculumWhere are the Women? examines the status of women’s history in state-level social studies standards. It is the most up-to-date evaluation of women’s history integration in US public, K-12 education.

Download the report here. https://www.womenshistory.org/social-studies-standards

The report discusses the ways that that women’s history is characterized in US K-12 social studies standards and, by extension, in textbooks and public school classrooms.  Interesting findings include:

  • Names of 178 individual women named in state standards
  • Most and least studied women’s history topics
  • Women’s history marginalization in standards

The report includes the women’s history standards for each state.  Readers can see for themselves how women’s unique history is presented state-by-state. Teachers and museum educators will have complete standards for each state to use in creating lessons and programs. Women’s history scholars will see the expected knowledge base for incoming freshmen. Education and curriculum researchers will have access to the data set for their own work.

Please reach out with any questions or comments.

All the best,

Liz Maurer

 

Elizabeth Maurer
Director of Program
National Women’s History Museum
205 S. Whiting St. Suite 254
Alexandria, VA 22304
Phone: 571-800-6556

www.womenshistory.org

 

Articles

Civics Ed workshops

In Alerts on May 28, 2017 by Randolph Hollingsworth Tagged: ,

The Kentucky Department of Education will host the 2017 Kentucky Civics Symposium to promote best practices in civic education. This symposium will occur 9 a.m.-4 p.m. in three locations across the state:

  • June 19 – Frankfort, Old Capitol Building and Kentucky Historical Society
  • July 10 – Elizabethtown, Hardin County Schools Early College and Career Center
  • July 14 – Ashland, Kentucky Educational Development Corporation

Join us as speakers provide educators with hands-on support in creating civic curricula with robust, relevant learning experiences for students in an effort to promote the “doing” of social studies through action civics. You can:

  • learn new social studies-related strategies that engage and motivate students;
  • dig into effective strategies for improved student achievement; and
  • gain a deeper understanding of civics best practices.

Information regarding the new citizenship test will be provided. [See Senate Bill 159 signed into law in March that requires all public high school students to pass a civics test in order to receive a regular diploma.]

Register for this event by clicking here (https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/kdecivics). For more information, see the attached flyer or contact Lauren Gallicchio, KDE’s social studies consultant.

Lauren Gallicchio, NBCT
Social Studies Academic Program Consultant
Division of Program Standards
Office of Teaching and Learning
Kentucky Department of Education
300 Sower Blvd, 5th Floor
Frankfort, KY 40601
502-564-9850, ext. 4140
lauren.gallicchio@education.ky.gov

Articles

KY Soc Studies

In Alerts on May 6, 2017 by Randolph Hollingsworth Tagged: , , ,

This just in from Christy Cartner, Bryan Station High School, Kentucky Council for the Social Studies – Steering Committee

——————————————————————————————————————————

Friends of Social Studies,

We are seeking your help in ensuring that social studies is well represented within the new accountability system. I don’t have to explain how social studies education helps foster “the whole child.” The KY Department of Education (KDE) is seeking feedback on a new accountability system that corresponds with the ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act). Recently, town hall meetings were held with Commissioner Pruitt and now they are requesting participation in a survey. This survey will likely close within the week, so time is of the essence!

Please take a few minutes to fill out the survey and pass it along to teachers, administrators, students, family, members of the community, etc. Also, don’t forget to complete it for yourself! Survey results are being collected on a spreadsheet, which will inform Commissioner Pruitt of our opinions and concerns moving forward. The survey includes Feedback Statements designed to collect your reaction on a scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). Sample responses with a Social Studies focus are at the bottom of this message.

Survey Link:

https://www.research.net/r/KyAccountability

Here are some resources to better understand the accountability system:

Here are the survey questions. Feel free to use these responses which are specific to Social Studies advocacy:

  • Please choose the primary role that best describes you.
    Personal opinion
  • The dashboard gauges communicate a simple, high level picture of school performance (pg. 7 of PPT)
    Personal opinion
  • A school that has a large gap or a student group that is underperforming and not making progress should not be able to earn the highest overall rating.
    Personal opinion
  • Kentuckians will be more informed by including both measures that are part of a school’s accountability rating and measures that are reported only.
    Personal opinion
  • It is critical to report how much students have the opportunity to participate in quality experiences and have access to school supports which impact their success.
    Personal opinion – and some sample responses: “While I am encouraged by many of the indicators which seem to be opening the door to accountability approaches that are reflective of different needs and learning styles, I have concerns as to what “opportunity and access” indicators might look like for social studies. Because civic education is the original intent of education and because most schools include civics as part of their mission statements, we think that it is imperative that civic education be included within the “Opportunity and Access” section of the the new accountability system as nothing addresses the whole child than preparing them for civic engagement. This is not just a social studies issue, but an educational one across all contents and grade levels. How will looking at what programs are offered really reflect for a content area that has mandated requirements? Even looking at how many courses and electives are offered will reveal very little about the quality of the program in terms of reporting. I encourage you to consider ways that not only social studies but other program areas might also be leveraged to better the educational experiences for our students.”
  • Schools should help prepare students with essential skills (i.e., responsibility, dependability)
    Personal opinion – and some sample responses: “I am encouraged by the “Transition Readiness” component of the proposed accountability system. However, I am concerned that nowhere in any of the language is include anything related to civic readiness. While there is mention of service learning, this concept is substantially different than civic learning or informed civic engagement. I would argue that the basis of all proposed measures in the “Transition Readiness” component are truly measures of civic readiness. Our system of public education was created with two vitally important purposes, to prepare our youth for success in a career and equally importantly, to provide the knowledge and skills to be an informed, engaged citizenry. Civic learning in schools is the most effective way to prepare Kentucky’s students for informed and active participation in not only a healthy democracy, but in a healthy workforce. As a result, we would like to ask that this notion be considered and that measures of “foundational essential skills” be highly embedded and interwoven with civic skills, knowledge and dispositions.”
  • High schools should help prepare students with essential skills (for example, attendance, responsibility and dependability).
    Personal opinion – and some sample responses: “I agree that “staying with the status quo is not good enough for the Commonwealth. We need a system that will generate better outcomes for all of our kids and will support the economic development of Kentucky.” The basis for such a statement assumes an educated and informed citizenry in the areas of government and civics, geography, cultural studies, economics and historical thinking. Your statement demands a robust social studies education in order to meet this goal. Social studies education remains the only content area that has yet to receive standards since 2009’s SB1. I advocate that social studies standards—which include both content and skill development–be made a priority. Consider the potential of a high school capstone project, centered in civic readiness and community participation.
  • Allowing multiple ways (for example, tests, advanced coursework or dual credit) for students to demonstrate academic or technical readiness at high school is important and desirable.
    Personal opinion – and some sample responses: “It is my opinion that such a system is long overdue and that the people of our Commonwealth deserve nothing less. As an informed social studies educator, I am united in our concern for an adequate and acceptable answer to the question of accountability. I cannot afford to shy away from trying to improve social studies education for our most precious commodity, our students. Social studies is one of the remaining content areas that has not adopted revised standards since SB 1 of 2009 called for revisions by law. While I applaud that the new accountability system calls for assessments to be aligned to standards, it is past time for new standards to drive the new assessments. It is my hope that we will continue down the path of non-traditional assessments like those currently being developed in science and that something similar will be created for social studies – something to encourage best instructional practices rather than teaching to a test.”
  • Reporting additional credentials for students with a Kentucky Plus designation is positive. (see pg. 2 of “At a Glance” document)
    Personal opinion – and some sample responses: “A Kentucky Plus designation allows students to be recognized for mastering advanced specific skills in addition to “transition readiness” credentials. I would love to see a civic readiness component or democratic distinction that students could add to their diploma. Civic education should appear within “Transition Readiness” as students need to engage each other, different ideas, and as an all encompassing part of each grade level.”
  • It is important for students to have personal growth targets toward proficiency.
    Personal opinion
  • Growth should be reported at the school level based on students’ individual growth grouped together for the school, according to whether students “catch up,” “keep up,” or “move up.
    Personal opinion
  • Kentucky schools should be expected to improve the proficiency of every student group, every year.
    Personal opinion
  • Reporting the disparity between demographic groups in the School Report Card is valuable.
    Personal opinion
  • Reporting student outcomes some time at the postsecondary level is an important measure of high school readiness and should be reported even though a school cannot directly control student variables that may impact outcomes.
    Personal opinion

Christy Cartner
Bryan Station High School, Lexington KY – US History, APUSH
Kentucky Council for the Social Studies – Steering Committee

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